‘In Kharms Way’

Initially commissioned as a 20 minute performance for the Rotozaza Connexions festival (Paris, 2001) and subsequently developed into a full length show, In Kharms Way takes texts by the Russian absurdist author Daniil Kharms and explodes them onto the stage into a raucous piece of musical theatre, weaving together voice, saxophone and electronics, and taking in Ted’s skills as a pupetter and performer.

In Kharms Way has been performed sporadically to much acclaim since its inception and continues to enthrall audiences at festivals throughout Europe (most recently at the Brighton International Festival 2009).

Synopsis

Angry, frustrated, analytical and satirical, but always in awe of the absurd manifestation we call human society, the works of Daniil Kharms (1905-1942, Russia) bring to the front of our collective consciousness a final, desperate image of the human condition: a well-oiled machine driving insatiably towards the edge of oblivion.

Daniil Kharm’s reality is filled with the intricate observations of men and women struggling to grasp the logic of their predicaments. Failed by the tools of reason and the grace of government they find salvation in the absurd. With it’s incisive irony and bitter-sweet satire the absurd has the power to make sense of the last vestiges of humanity, where everything else has failed.

Interestingly enough, it is a way of seeing the world that is at least as relevant today as it was in Soviet-era Russia. In a society obsessed with the construction of wealth at any price, Daniil Kharms’s words resonate with ever more insight as we struggle to come to terms with our own existential predicament.

In Kharms Way presents a snapshot of this reality, animated and shot into the present via the eager, intense vocalisation, saxophone playing and puppetry of Ted Milton and Sam Britton’s deconstructed, rewired laptop computer.

Book and Recording

In Kharms Way was documented in 2003 in a limited edition handmade book and CD, published during a residency at Nadine in Brussels.


The Incubating Period


On Space, Time and Existence


A Straight Line